Where? – 18 – Places in Children’s Literature

As with last week’s post on paintings, there are so many options for a literature theme.  To narrow it down a bit, I have limited this to children’s literature, and where there is a very clear link to an actual place, as opposed to just inspired by.

As usual, print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, and find somebody for a bit of competition.

Have a guess at the location of these places by marking your map with a small circle and writing the name of the place next to it.

  1. Ashdown Forest – Winnie the Pooh
  2. Bantry Bay – The Cottage at Bantry Bay
  3. Coll – Katy Marag
  4. Isles of Scilly – Why the Whales Came
  5. Lake District – Peter Rabbit, Swallows and Amazons
  6. London – Mary Poppins, Paddington, Peter Pan
  7. Norfolk Broads – Coot Club, The Big Six
  8. North-West Highlands – Kidnapped
  9. Sherwood Forest – The Adventures of Robin Hood
  10. Thames Valley – The Wind in the Willows
  11. Walton-on-the-Naze – Secret Water
  12. Watership Down (North Hampshire) – Watership Down
  13. Yorkshire – The Railway Children, The Secret Garden

If I’ve missed any of your favourites, do add them to the list.

Then when you are ready, scroll down, past my pictures, to find the answers.  If you are having a competition, then 2 points if your spot touches mine.  Spots 5, 7, and 8 can have 2 points for anywhere within the dotted line.  Spot 13 is roughly in the middle of Yorkshire, but it’s a big county, with a wiggly shape so I haven’t drawn the area.  You can have 2 points for anything within 1cm of spot 13.  And as usual, if no one scores 2, the nearest person gets 1 point.

Bantry Bay
Bryher, Isles of Scilly
Lake District
Thames valley

Finally check your inbox for a map with all the dots in roughly the right place, ready for labelling.  (Fill in the form in the side bar if you have yet to sign up.)

And this is the last in this series.  I hope you enjoyed it!

Where? – 17 – Places in Paintings

There are loads of landscape paintings out there, but often the view is a general scene, with little clue as to the location.  However, many of Turner’s landscapes are clearly located, and there’s loads of them too.  I could have made a whole post with just his paintings, but I’ve added in a few other artists, to include some famous works and to ensure a good range of places.

As usual, print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, and find somebody for a bit of competition.

Each location has a link to the painting.  Maybe that will help with the geography…or maybe not.  Anyway, do have a guess, by marking your map with a small circle and writing the name of the place next to it.

We’ll start with paintings by Turner (1775 – 1851).

  1. Beachy Head  
  2. Dover
  3. Durham
  4. Edinburgh
  5. Harlech
  6. Melrose
  7. River Clyde  
  8. Isle of Skye
  9. Snowdon
  10. Connemara by Henry
  11. Dublin by Ashford
  12. Eton by Canaletto
  13. Powerscourt Waterfall, Wicklow Mountains by Barret
  14. River Stour by Constable
  15. Salisbury by Constable
  16. Westminster by Monet
  17. Weymouth by Constable

When you are ready, scroll down, past my photos, to find the answers.  If you are having a competition, then 2 points if your spot touches mine.  If everyone is way out, then the nearest gets 1 point.

Connemara
Westminster
Isle of Skye
Snowdon

Finally check your inbox for a map with all the dots in roughly the right place, ready for labelling. (Sign up form is in the side bar.)

Enjoy!

Where? – 16 – Places that Inspired Music

I hope you enjoyed last week’s post on places that inspired songs.  This week we’ve some more music, but this time no lyrics.  This means that the place links are literally the titles of the pieces.  Some of them are maybe nothing to do with the places whose names they share but you’ll find some familiar tunes, including a Christmas carol!

As usual, print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, and find somebody for a bit of competition.

For each of the songs I’ve given you a youtube link.  There are no lyrics this time, and mostly not much to watch as many are just someone playing the piece.  The exception is Fingal’s Cave.  Watch that one!

So have a listen and, for each track, guess the location on your map, by putting a small circle where you think it is and writing the name next to the circle.

  1. Aberystwyth
  2. Cool Breeze of Brighton  
  3. Cwm Rhondda  
  4. Down Ampney  
  5. Fingal’s Cave Overture 
  6. Hereford
  7. Irby  
  8. Londonderry Air  
  9. Melrose
  10. Nottingham
  11. Padstow Lifeboat 
  12. Trip to Sligo 
  13. Westminster

When you are ready, scroll down, past my pictures, to find the answers.  If you are having a competition, then 2 points if your spot touches mine.  If everyone is way out, then the nearest gets 1 point.

Aberystwyth
Westminster

Finally check your inbox for a map with all the dots in roughly the right place, ready for labelling.  (If you’ve yet to sign up, you will find the form in the sidebar.)

 

Where? – 15 – Places that Inspired Songs

The next two weeks of Discovering Where are inspired by music, because the landscape and places of the British Isles have themselves inspired tonnes of music over the years.

This week it’s songs and next week instrumental music.

I’ve had a lot of fun putting this one together and I’ve had a few cross-curricula ideas too.  So, I’ll email out a sheet of notes to subscribers.  (Form is in the side-bar if you want to sign up.)

As usual, print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, and find somebody for a bit of competition.

For each of the songs I’ve given you a youtube link.  I’ve tried to pick versions that show something of the landscape or place that is in the song, so some of them have good location clues.  One even has a map!

I’ve watched the videos and checked the lyrics so you should be good to go on these.  There are a couple of others that didn’t make the cut for various reasons, which I will mention in the notes so that you can check them out for yourself.

So listen to the songs, watch the videos and guess the location on your map by putting a small circle where you think it is and writing the name next to the circle.

  1. Are You Right There Michael – West Clare, Ireland
  2. Dirty Old Town – Salford
  3. Ferry Across the Mersey
  4. It’s a Long Way to Tipperary
  5. Loch Lomond
  6. Manchester Rambler
  7. Molly Malone – Dublin
  8. Mull of Kintyre
  9. On Ilkla Moor Baht’At – Ilkley Moor
  10. Skye Boat Song
  11. Solsbury Hill
  12. Sunshine on Leith
  13. Taking a Trip up to Abergavenny
  14. The Fields of Athenry
  15. The Rose of Tralee

When you are ready, scroll down, past my pictures of Skye, to find the answers.  If you are having a competition, then 2 points if your spot touches mine.  If everyone is way out, then the nearest gets 1 point.

Finally check your inbox for a map with all the dots in roughly the right place, ready for labelling, which I’ll send with the cross-curricula notes.

Enjoy!

 

Where? – 14 – Motorways

This week we are going to discover the location of some of Britain’s motorways and main routes.

We’ll start with a basic outline.  Here’s your starting map to print.

I’ve added 4 shapes to the map, each of which is a motorway route round a major city.  Do you know which cities?

Now let’s take one country at a time and add extra lines and labels to show some of the main route network.

We’ll start with England, as the following routes all intersect with one or more of the city rings.  Don’t worry about all the twists and turns – just go in roughly the right direction and if you haven’t a clue – have a guess!

  • M1
  • M3
  • M4 – crosses into Wales
  • M5
  • M6
  • M11
  • M20
  • M23
  • M25
  • M40
  • M42
  • M60
  • M62
  • And the A1, which is the A1(M) motorway along some of its route and crosses into Scotland.

There is a logical system to the numbering of Britain’s roads and those that start with a 7, 8 or 9 are all in Scotland.  There is no M7 but add:

  • M8
  • M9

Northern Ireland has its own numbering system and its longest motorway is another M1.

And guess what – Ireland also has an M1 and another logical system.  Join these to the loop I’ve started for you.

  • M1
  • M3
  • M4
  • M7
  • M11
  • M50

Finally personalise your map with any routes that are relevant to you – maybe a frequent journey or the roads coming from your nearest town.

I don’t have many pictures of roads but here is an unusual shot taken from the bridge that crosses the River Thames to the east of London.

And here are the answers.

If you got it a bit muddled, don’t worry.  I’ll email out a version showing all the lines, ready for labels to be added.  If you are not yet on my email list, fill out the form in the sidebar to get yourself added.

Where? – 13 – Seaside Resorts

A few weeks ago, we found out the location of some coastal towns that are ferry ports.  We are at the coast again today, but these towns are more known as seaside resorts.

I have tried to pick resorts that have been popular for years – the sort of places that the Victorians built railways to, to connect them to the cities.  Britain’s biggest towns all had railway links to the coast and these are some of the places that the trains visited.

Print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, and find somebody for a bit of competition.

For each resort, put a small circle where you think it is and write the name next to the circle.

  1. Bangor (Northern Ireland)
  2. Blackpool
  3. Bournemouth
  4. Brighton
  5. Bundoran
  6. Clacton
  7. Clonakilty
  8. Curracloe
  9. Dunoon
  10. Eastbourne
  11. Great Yarmouth
  12. Llandudno
  13. Margate
  14. Morecambe
  15. Portobello
  16. Portrush
  17. Rhyl
  18. Scarborough
  19. Skegness
  20. Southend
  21. Southport
  22. Torquay
  23. Tramore
  24. Weston-Super-Mare
  25. Weymouth

When you are ready, scroll down, past my pictures, to find the answers.  If you are having a competition, then 2 points if your spot touches mine.  If everyone is way out, then the nearest gets 1 point.

Blackpool
Distant Weymouth

I’m not emailing out a map this week.  You should be able to create your own version, on a blank outline map, using the coast as a guide.

Where? – 12 – Forests

Last week’s battlefields were tricky, weren’t they?  Some of these forests cover quite a large area.  Does that make it easier?

Once again print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, find somebody for a bit of competition, and let’s see what you know already.

Here are Britain’s ten biggest forest areas, plus some of the more well-known smaller ones.

  1. Affric Forest Park
  2. Argyll Forest Park
  3. Brechfa Forest
  4. Camore Wood
  5. Cannock Chase
  6. Castlewellan Forest Park
  7. Epping Forest
  8. Forest of Dean
  9. Galloway Forest Park
  10. Glenariff Forest Park
  11. Glengarry Forest Park
  12. Kielder Forest Park
  13. National Forest
  14. New Forest
  15. Queen Elizabeth Forest Park
  16. Sherwood Forest
  17. Tay Forest Park
  18. Thetford Forest Park

Britain’s forest cover is low compared with the rest of Europe, but Ireland has even less.  Ireland’s Millennium Forests project has been set up to establish 16 new forests in the 21st century.  Find out about them here.

Now scroll past my pictures for your quiz answers.  I’ve tried to put my spots roughly in the centre of each forest area, so if you are within 1cm of mine then count it as correct.

Forest of Dean
Bit of a clue there!

If you are signed up for worksheets, check your inbox for a map of the correct locations, ready for you to label. (If you want to sign up, the form is in the side bar.)

Where? – 11 – Battlefields

If you have been following this series of posts, then a few weeks ago you would have learnt the location of some historical towns.  We have a history theme again today, but a visit to these places may just take you to a grassy field, with little else there, except perhaps a memorial.

Print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, and find somebody for a bit of competition.

For each battlefield, put a small circle where you think it is and write the name next to the circle.

  1. Arklow (Ireland)
  2. Bannockburn
  3. Battle of the Boyne (Ireland)
  4. Bosworth Field
  5. Collooney (Ireland)
  6. Culloden
  7. Flodden
  8. Hastings
  9. Kinsale (Ireland)
  10. Marston Moor
  11. Montgomery
  12. Mounthill (Northern Ireland)
  13. Naseby
  14. Sedgemoor
  15. Stanford Bridge

When you are ready, scroll down, past my pictures, to find the answers.

Battlefields don’t make particularly interesting photographs, if they are just grassy fields, but a battle re-enactment brings it all to life.  These were taken at Holly Holy Day, a re-enactment of the Battle of Nantwich, which takes place every January.

My inland spots may not be spot on so give yourself 2 points if you are within 1cm (you may be closer than me!)  If you are having a competition, and everyone is way out, then the nearest gets 1 point.

There are hundreds of battlefield sites across Britain and Ireland.  For a greater range of sites and more information, check out this site for battlefields in Britain.  The Ordnance Survey Ireland gives more detail about the Irish battles and suggested walks around the locations.

I’ll email out a map with all the dots in roughly the right place, ready for labelling.  (Scroll up and fill in the form in the side bar if you want to be added to my mailing list.)

Where? – 10 – Ferry Ports

Last week we looked at landmarks of the natural kind, quite a few of which were on the coast.  We are at the coast again this week, for ferry ports.

Print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, and find somebody for a bit of competition.

For each port, put a small circle where you think it is and write the name next to the circle.

  1. Aberdeen
  2. Belfast
  3. Cairnryan
  4. Cork
  5. Cowes
  6. Douglas
  7. Dover
  8. Dublin
  9. Dun Laoghaire
  10. Felixstowe
  11. Fishguard
  12. Harwich
  13. Heysham
  14. Holyhead
  15. Kingston Upon Hull
  16. Larne
  17. Lerwick
  18. Liverpool
  19. Newcastle Upon Tyne
  20. Newhaven
  21. Oban
  22. Pembroke
  23. Penzance
  24. Plymouth
  25. Poole
  26. Portsmouth
  27. Rosslare
  28. Stromness
  29. Southampton
  30. Stornoway
  31. Uig
  32. Weymouth

That was easy wasn’t it!

But seriously coastal places are much easier to locate.

When you are ready, scroll down, past my pictures, to find the answers.  If you are having a competition then 2 points if your spot touches mine.  If everyone is way out, then the nearest gets 1 point.

Distant Weymouth
Holyhead
Douglas
Dublin
Fishguard

I’m not emailing out a map this week.  You should be able to create your own version, on a blank outline map, using the coast as a guide.

Where? – 9 – Natural Landmarks

Last week we found out the location of some man-made landmarks in the British Isles.  Now we’ll try some natural landmarks.

Print out a blank outline map.  You can use the one below.

The best way to learn where things are is to put them on a map, but if I just give you a completed map, that won’t help much, so grab a blank map and a pencil, and find somebody for a bit of competition.

For each landmark, put a small circle where you think it is and write the name next to the circle.

  1. Brimham Rocks
  2. Calf of Man
  3. Cheddar Gorge
  4. Chesil Beach
  5. Cliffs of Moher
  6. Flamborough Head
  7. Gaping Gill
  8. Giant’s Causeway
  9. Loch Lomond
  10. Loch Ness
  11. Lulworth Cove
  12. Malham Cove
  13. Pistyll Rhaeadr
  14. Spurn Head
  15. The Burren
  16. The Needles
  17. The Seven Sisters
  18. White Cliffs of Dover

Add some others if you want to.

When you are ready, scroll down, past my pictures, to find the answers.  My inland spots may not be spot on so give yourself 2 points if you are within 1cm (you may be closer than me!)  If you are having a competition, and everyone is way out, then the nearest gets 1 point.

Chesil Beach
Lulworth Cove
The Burren
Cliffs of Moher
Calf of Man
Giant’s Causeway
Loch Ness
Pistyll Rhaeadr

Check your inbox for a map with all the dots in roughly the right place, ready for labelling.  (Scroll up and fill in the form in the side bar if you want to be added to my mailing list.)  Though if you have been following this series from the beginning you should by now be an expert at copying the dots into the right place on a blank map, using only the coastal outline to help you.